Talent & Tech: Embracing Collaboration with AI for Workplace Success | Joey Price | TEDxJeffersonU | Collaboration with AI

Talent & Tech: Embracing Collaboration with AI for Workplace Success | Joey Price | TEDxJeffersonU | Collaboration with AI

Talent & Tech: Embracing Collaboration with AI for Workplace Success

Have you ever wondered about the future of your job in the era of Artificial Intelligence (AI)? Is Collaboration with AI a possibility for most workers across the globe?

Join Joey Price, founder of Jumpstart, a national HR consulting firm, as he navigates the potential impact of AI on work and life. First, Joey raises a critical question: Could AI jeopardize our jobs and limit our children’s ability to find fulfilling careers? Secondly, through personal anecdotes, he sheds light on the transformative influence of AI, and underscores the ethical considerations surrounding AI. Finally urging the audience to envision a future where AI is an ally, not a threat, creating workplaces that inspire excitement.

In a compelling call to action, Joey advocates for the responsible development of AI, ensuring it enhances human potential and prioritizes the well-being of workers in this new era. Join Joey Price on this captivating exploration of AI’s role in reshaping our work and lives.

To learn more about the work that Jumpstart does to bring better collaboration between talent and technology at work, schedule a free 15-minute consultation call.

About Joey:

Joey V. Price is an award-winning Human Resources Executive, thought leader, and the Founder and CEO of Jumpstart:HR. The company offers HR outsourcing and consulting for startups and small businesses. Joey also co-hosts the “While We Were Working” weekly podcast for leaders in the workplace who wish to be better at handling people’s issues. A seasoned HR professional with hands-on experience in multiple organizations, Joey advocates for businesses to translate their goal into high ROI through happily engaged staff members. He also serves on the Advisory Board for the HR Department at the Forbes School of Business and Technology, the UKG Workforce Institute, and the Ethics in AI Board at Arena Analytics. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

HR Podcast: Is your workplace PUMP Act Friendly? + Can I-9’s Be Completed Remotely?

HR Podcast: Is your workplace PUMP Act Friendly? + Can I-9’s Be Completed Remotely?

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Welcome to another insightful episode of the “While We Were Working” HR podcast! In this episode, we delve into the latest developments surrounding the PUMP Act and the question of whether Form I-9’s need to be completed in person. Join our expert panel as we discuss the implications of these new requirements and their impact on employers and employees alike.

 

Timestamps:

00:00 – Introduction

01:59 – Understanding the PUMP Act: Exploring its new requirements (While We Were Working Segment)

15:04 – Form I-9: In-person completion or remote alternatives? (Consultant’s Corner Segment)

Episode Details:

In this engaging HR podcast episode, our knowledgeable hosts dive deep into the intricacies of the PUMP Act, shedding light on the updated requirements that organizations need to be aware of.

We analyze the key aspects of the legislation and explore its potential implications on businesses, employee rights, and compliance obligations.

Form I-9, a crucial document for verifying employment eligibility, has traditionally required in-person completion. However, in light of evolving workplace dynamics and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we examine whether digital alternatives and remote completion options can be considered viable alternatives.

We discuss the benefits and challenges associated with these approaches and provide practical insights for employers navigating this changing landscape.

As we unravel the complexities surrounding the PUMP Act and Form I-9 requirements, our expert panel offers valuable perspectives and actionable advice.

Gain insights into compliance considerations, best practices, and the potential consequences of non-compliance.

Whether you are an employer, HR professional, or an employee seeking clarity on these matters, this episode equips you with the knowledge needed to adapt and comply with the new regulations.

Tune in to the “While We Were Working” podcast and join the conversation surrounding the PUMP Act and the evolving landscape of Form I-9 completion.

Stay informed, make informed decisions, and ensure compliance in this ever-changing world of employment regulations with our weekly HR podcast.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, and share this episode with others who may find this information valuable. Stay tuned for more engaging discussions on the “While We Were Working” podcast!

Do you need to outfit a room at your office for PUMP Act compliance? Check out this chair and more from Amazon.com

#PUMPAct #FormI9 #EmploymentRegulations #Compliance #HR #Podcast

 

Hosts: Joey Price and Sommer Ketron

This show is powered by Jumpstart:HR, LLC

Is a 4-Day Work Week Right for Your Small Business? Pros, Cons and Tips for Implementation

Is a 4-Day Work Week Right for Your Small Business? Pros, Cons and Tips for Implementation

While the four-day work week is not yet universal, most citizens enjoy the pleasures of added three-day weekends during the year.

– Michael From

The idea of a 4-day work week has gained popularity in recent years, with some small businesses opting to implement this schedule in order to increase productivity and improve employee satisfaction. However, before making the switch to a 4-day work week, it’s important to consider both the pros and cons.

Pros of Implementing a 4-Day Work Week:

  1. Increased productivity: By condensing the workweek, employees have more time to rest and recharge, which can lead to a more productive and engaged workforce.
  2. Reduced burnout: The added day off each week can help to reduce stress and burnout among employees, leading to a more positive work environment.
  3. Attracting and retaining employees: A 4-day work week can be an attractive benefit for potential employees, making it easier for small businesses to attract and retain top talent.
  4. Cost savings: A 4-day workweek can lead to cost savings for small businesses, as they may need to pay less for utilities, office space, and other expenses associated with keeping the office open an extra day.

Cons of Implementing a 4-Day Work Week:

  1. Reduced hours for employees: A 4-day work week can mean that employees work longer hours on the days they are in the office, which can be tiring and lead to decreased productivity.
  2. Reduced availability: With a shorter workweek, small businesses may be closed an extra day, which can make it harder for customers to reach them.
  3. Difficulty with scheduling: A 4-day workweek can make it harder for small businesses to schedule meetings and appointments, as everyone may not be available on the same days.
  4. Difficulty accommodating with unexpected events: A 4-day workweek can make it harder for small businesses to handle unexpected events, such as a rush of customers or an emergency repair, as they may not have enough staff on hand.

Listen to our Small Business HR podcast:

If you are considering implementing a 4-day workweek, here are some practical tips for making it work:

  1. Communicate with employees: Make sure to talk to your employees about the potential change and get their input.
  2. Test it out: Consider starting with a trial period to see how a 4-day workweek works for your business and your employees.
  3. Be flexible: Be willing to adjust the schedule as needed to accommodate the needs of your employees and your business.
  4. Plan ahead: Make sure to plan ahead for meetings and appointments, so that everyone is available on the same days.
  5. Be prepared for unexpected events: Have a plan in place for handling unexpected events, such as having a designated employee who can come in on their day off in case of an emergency.

Overall, a 4-day workweek can be a great option for small businesses looking to increase productivity and improve employee satisfaction. However, it’s important to carefully consider the pros and cons and be prepared to make adjustments as needed to make it work for your business.

Want to see if a 4-Day Work Week can work for your business? Contact us today.

Remote Work Q&A Podcast With Ultimate Software’s Cecile Alper-Leroux [Full Interview]

Remote Work Q&A Podcast With Ultimate Software’s Cecile Alper-Leroux [Full Interview]


Download the full report here: https://www.ultimatesoftware.com/Remote-Work-Research

In this HR video podcast, Jumpstart:HR Founder Joey Price is joined by Cecile Alper-Leroux. She is the VP of Human Capital Management (HCM) Innovation at Ultimate Software, a company that provides HCM solutions in order to help organizations improve the employee experience and grow their business.

Cecil has over 20 years of experience in both national and global market and she is an internationally sought-out speaker, thought leader, and visionary on HCM trends, hot topics, and global strategies. She joined Ultimate Software in 2010 and she’s been focusing on fostering a culture of innovation at Ultimate ever since.

In this video, we will be going over the results of their latest research on the benefits of remote workers.

Our topics include:

  • What is the current state of remote work?
  • The results of Ulitmate Software’s latest study on the effects of remote work.
  • What are some of the key benefits that should encourage employers to add remote work to their business model?
  • How will having an increased number of remote workers affect managerial roles?
  • How is remote work helping women in the workplace?
  • The technological trends that are helping bridge the gap between the office and the remote workforce.

All that and a whole lot more! Stay tuned for another action-packed episode of the Business, Life, and Coffee Podcast!

Connect with Cecile:

If you enjoyed this episode please take time to give it a 5-star review!

Learn More: http://bit.ly/blcitunes

Also, check out some of our previous episodes for more advice and tips on how to boost your career and take your business to the next level!

See you next week!

Listen to More Episodes: iTunes | Podbean | Spotify

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Editor: Peja M.

Music: https://www.instagram.com/iamayoh/

Are You Hiring an Intern or an Employee?: The Seven Factors That Make for a True Internship Experience

Are You Hiring an Intern or an Employee?: The Seven Factors That Make for a True Internship Experience

Do You Know The Rules On Paid and Unpaid Internships?

“I’m looking for an intern because I just lost a critical employee.”

“We believe interns should be ready to contribute on the first day of their internship!”

“Our interns work as long as they’d like!”

If any of these three statements reflect your paid or unpaid internship experience, I hate to break it to you but you’re doing it wrong. Students who agree to join your organization shouldn’t be evaluated the same way as an entry-level employee because the rules of engagement aren’t the same. A quick rule of thumb is that employees are hired to SHOW and interns are groomed to GROW. If you’re in the middle of the hiring process for your summer interns and think you might be going about it wrong, we’ve got you covered!

This article will explain:

  • The merits of paid and unpaid internships
  • The seven factors that the Federal Government uses to validate an internship program
  • What to do if you’re stuck or confused

 

Are Internships Still Worth It?

If you’re a hiring manager at your organization, you’re probably wondering if internships still matter. In an era of AI and bots, lean teams and freelancers; the idea of hiring an intern might feel like an afterthought. Not only do interns legally require more hand-holding than other labor classes, but turnover is darn-near 100% since unlike Mike in Accounting who’s been at your company since the pre-Internet age, internships have to end at some point! In my professional opinion, internships are worth it for employers and interns alike! My thoughts on the subject are below but I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments section or by tweeting me on Twitter (@joeyvpriceHR).

Did you know that 70% of employees say “training” is a key retention tool for them?

Check out our new employee development course site today!

If you’ve ever looked at entry-level job descriptions (or written one lately), you know the conundrum that early-stage employees face. Many “entry-level” jobs require at least 1 or 2 years of experience in the industry… But how does one get this experience without having experience? Well, a perfect way is through an internship. Whether a student has a paid or unpaid internship, there’s redeeming value for the student who makes the most of their time at work. Yes, unpaid internships continue to be a hot topic on college campuses but they do pay off. Unpaid internships offer a whole host of opportunities for students who make the most of their limited time on your team:

  • Valuable work experience
  • Opportunities to network with industry professionals
  • A chance at reducing college tuition debt

Internships also benefit employers in many ways. They offer employers a way to begin building a pipeline of future talent, increase brand recognition among early-stage professionals, and may provide skilled labor at a discounted cost to help support mission-critical tasks. However, internships also come with a degree of risk, and an unsuspecting employer may find themselves under scrutiny or facing legal penalties and fines if their internship programs do not measure up to Federal, State, and local guidelines.

What Mistakes Do Employers Make When Hiring Interns?

Perhaps the biggest issue that arises when providing internships is whether the experience actually constitutes an internship, or if it is considered to be employment. Remember, internships are meant to be an educational experience first and foremost. Thankfully, there is Federal guidance on what makes a good internship program! The following criteria and tests can be used when determining whether or not your internship program is truly an internship:

  1. Both the intern and the employer understand that the intern is not entitled to compensation

Make it clear to your interns from the very start that they will not be paid for their efforts as an intern. Try to capture this in writing either when you offer the internship to the student, or in the original announcement to which the intern applies.

  1. The internship provides training that would be given in an educational setting.

Say goodbye to the days of making your interns take everyday coffee runs, lunch orders, and other menial tasks. The work that an intern is asked to complete should be similar to that of what they would otherwise do or learn in the classroom (business majors should learn about business functions and processes, political science majors should gain an understanding of the political process, etc.)

  1. Completing the internship entitles the intern to academic credit

So, if the intern isn’t getting paid in money, what should they be paid in? Why, academic credit of course. Work with academic institutions’ internship coordinators to coordinate how many hours an internship will be expected to work, and how many credit hours the intern may be expected to receive.

  1. The internship is limited in duration and educates the intern

Put a time limit on how long the intern will be expected to work for your company. This helps in setting expectations for your interns, as well as in determining the number of credits your interns will receive for their experience. How long should an intern last, you might ask….?

  1. The internship corresponds with the academic calendar.

Depending on the State, college, or academic program, this length might differ. However, make sure that the internship corresponds as closely as possible to the academic calendars of the colleges in which your interns are enrolled.

  1. The work complements, rather than displaces the work of a paid employee

Plain and simple, your interns should not replace your regular workers. Doing so almost universally results in your interns being considered regular, paid employees. Not to mention, it is also unethical and, if your interns continue not to be paid, could result in stiff fines for your company.

  1. The intern is not entitled or promised a paid job at the end of the internship.

Promising an intern a job doing essentially the same things they’ve been doing as an intern causes problems. Mainly, it essentially creates an “unpaid trial service period” to test out employees until they become regular employees. A documented or promised job at the end of the internship also can be seen as creating an employment relationship.

By no means does this list preclude you from paying your interns for the work they do for your company. In fact, you may need to pay your interns in order to be competitive and attract top college talent to intern for your organization. However, it is important to keep the above 7 factors in mind, regardless of whether your interns are paid or unpaid.

No More #MeToo_ Preventing Sexual Harassment at Work

Help Prevent Sexual Harassment with Our New Training Program.

Do You Want to Build The Perfect Internship Experience?

If you’ve gotten this far in the post, pat yourself on the back! It shows that you’re committed to helping your workplace be a launching point for successful students who benefit from mentorship at your office.  If you’re interested in building out your internship program – or refining it – contact us today! It never hurts to have a second set of professional eyes reviewing your program to make sure it’s perfect. Jumpstart:HR, LLC can assess your internship program for the following:

  • Does your internship program pass the seven-step test?
  • Is your internship program one that students want to sign up for?
  • How do you make the most of the time your interns have with you?
  • How do you attract interns that resonate with your brand/mission/values?
  • What do I need to know/do if an intern doesn’t quite work out and needs to be terminated?

These are all big questions that we talk for small businesses and small teams at larger institutions. Drop us a note and let’s chat!

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