HR Podcast: Is your workplace PUMP Act Friendly? + Can I-9’s Be Completed Remotely?

HR Podcast: Is your workplace PUMP Act Friendly? + Can I-9’s Be Completed Remotely?

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Welcome to another insightful episode of the “While We Were Working” HR podcast! In this episode, we delve into the latest developments surrounding the PUMP Act and the question of whether Form I-9’s need to be completed in person. Join our expert panel as we discuss the implications of these new requirements and their impact on employers and employees alike.

 

Timestamps:

00:00 – Introduction

01:59 – Understanding the PUMP Act: Exploring its new requirements (While We Were Working Segment)

15:04 – Form I-9: In-person completion or remote alternatives? (Consultant’s Corner Segment)

Episode Details:

In this engaging HR podcast episode, our knowledgeable hosts dive deep into the intricacies of the PUMP Act, shedding light on the updated requirements that organizations need to be aware of.

We analyze the key aspects of the legislation and explore its potential implications on businesses, employee rights, and compliance obligations.

Form I-9, a crucial document for verifying employment eligibility, has traditionally required in-person completion. However, in light of evolving workplace dynamics and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we examine whether digital alternatives and remote completion options can be considered viable alternatives.

We discuss the benefits and challenges associated with these approaches and provide practical insights for employers navigating this changing landscape.

As we unravel the complexities surrounding the PUMP Act and Form I-9 requirements, our expert panel offers valuable perspectives and actionable advice.

Gain insights into compliance considerations, best practices, and the potential consequences of non-compliance.

Whether you are an employer, HR professional, or an employee seeking clarity on these matters, this episode equips you with the knowledge needed to adapt and comply with the new regulations.

Tune in to the “While We Were Working” podcast and join the conversation surrounding the PUMP Act and the evolving landscape of Form I-9 completion.

Stay informed, make informed decisions, and ensure compliance in this ever-changing world of employment regulations with our weekly HR podcast.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, and share this episode with others who may find this information valuable. Stay tuned for more engaging discussions on the “While We Were Working” podcast!

Do you need to outfit a room at your office for PUMP Act compliance? Check out this chair and more from Amazon.com

#PUMPAct #FormI9 #EmploymentRegulations #Compliance #HR #Podcast

 

Hosts: Joey Price and Sommer Ketron

This show is powered by Jumpstart:HR, LLC

Building a Team: Three Myths Small Businesses Believe When Recruiting – And What To Do Instead

Building a Team: Three Myths Small Businesses Believe When Recruiting – And What To Do Instead

Before we talk about building a team, let’s take a walk down memory lane.

Do you remember the first time you were on a team? It could’ve been a second-grade soccer team where everyone got a trophy at the end of the year regardless of how well the team did. Or it was later in life, a twelfth-grade capstone project that required collaboration for completion. No matter when you experience your first time being on a team, there’s one truth about them: they’re everywhere. So how can something so common be consistently mismanaged? It may have more to do with what we believe about teams in the first place. 

“A team is more than a collection of people. It is a process of give and take.” – Barbara Glacel

In this article, I want to share the three myths that small businesses believe when building a team, why I think these myths exist, and how to overcome them. If these resonate with you, please share them with your team and consider working with mine.

Myth 1 when building a team: The right candidate is LOOKING for your business. 

Every day in America, companies post, pray, and ponder over job descriptions, hoping they’ve cooked up the right recipe for the ideal candidate to manifest in their applicant tracking system and solve all their workload and team chemistry woes.

Building a team is hard and I’ve even been there myself. Thinking that the only thing standing between our open positions and success is a fresh job description with KPIs and culture. Unfortunately, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Unless you are a household name like Apple or Amazon, how can we be so sure that someone even knows to look for us in the first place? Of course, we believe in our brand, mission, and team – but what do we do consistently to raise awareness about our businesses and their inner workings? Suppose you want to be found by the right candidate. In that case, you must think beyond the traditional job description and share what it’s like to work in your company. These days, 70% of job seekers are passive

Stop believing that the right candidate is LOOKING for your business. More often than not, it would be best to source the right candidate for your business. What is sourcing? It’s when you proactively find candidates instead of posting a job and sifting through hundreds of candidates. As you make this shift when building a team, you feel empowered to make proactive decisions to land your next key hire. One potential decision you should consider making? Work with a recruiting agency that will source talent and use tools that reduce the time and cost it takes to hire for your organization.

Myth 2 when building a team: The right hire comes from the right school or company. 

While so much has changed over the last decade within the recruiting industry, only some hiring managers have kept up.

There was once a time when notable schools and companies were reliable pipelines to fill cookie-cutter jobs with predictable expectations. I remember the days when building a team meant that applicants from relevant universities or companies were given an automatic second look – even if their qualifications weren’t quite there. Some would even get the benefit of the doubt when it came to salary since “they used to work at [fill in the blank], they must be good!” The problem with this way of thinking now (and quite frankly, always) is that it presents an unconscious bias against high-potential talent from non-traditional or traditional backgrounds without name recognition. Take the world of IT, for example, where the US Bureau of Labor Statistics says 25% of IT workers have no college degree. Are you willing to risk passing on game-changing talent because they don’t come from the background you envisioned they would?

Instead of believing the right hire comes from the right school or company, you should know that the right candidate can articulate their skills and how they align with what you need them to do. Interviewing is all about asking excellent questions and developing mutual trust. The next time you have an opportunity to chat with a candidate with the right experience but not the right name on their diploma, break out a few good questions where you ask them to describe their experience and what challenges they’ve faced along the way. Don’t hire based on which mascot they cheer for during March Madness; employ a team member for their ability to make an impact on your team today and tomorrow.

Myth 3 when building a team: We hire to find the right person. 

One of these days, I might write a book about the parallels of marriage and building a team – but that’s a story for another time.

Right now, though, I want to address a myth we’ve been carrying for years in small business circles: there are no unicorns, ninjas, or rockstars. Instead, there are hidden gems, high-potential hires, and developmental candidates you take a chance on because you see something. Companies often want to pass on great candidates in hopes of finding “the one.” It prolongs the search process, adds extra costs, and reduces the candidate experience for everyone. You rarely find someone better qualified than the candidate you passed on because they nailed four things but were “eh” on the fifth. 

Instead of believing you recruit to find the right person, consider recruiting to find someone competent in the role that vibes with your culture and is willing to be developed. Since we’re on the topic of teams, let me speak about a sports analogy: The NBA Draft. The most successful teams in the draft aren’t the ones who waste time trying to find someone who will be an MVP right away. The most successful teams in the draft are the ones who look at their organization’s style of play, which prospects play a similar kind of basketball, and who will train and study to perform at their best over time. It’s impractical to think there’s a perfect ready-made hire out there. Why? You have a unique culture, unique management structure, and maybe a few skeletons in your operational closet.

If you think about hiring as a big-picture project, your new hire will figure out how to paint themselves in that picture with you. 

So, what’s next?

Which myth resonates with you most? There are others, but these are the biggest, in my opinion. I’d love your thoughts and for you to share this post with your colleagues. Schedule a free 15-minute call with me if your business is in need of a fresh recruiting strategy.  

 Want more recruiting tips? Watch this video:

Why Having an Employee Handbook is Important?

Why Having an Employee Handbook is Important?

Employee Handbook is also known as an employee manual, staff handbook, or company policy manual.

It is a document which defines a company’s key policies and procedures and outlines its company culture.

The employee handbook can be used to bring together employment and job-related information which employees need to know.

Typically, it has three types of content:

Cultural

A welcome statement, the company’s mission or purpose, company values, and more.

General Information

Holiday arrangements, company perks, policies not required by law, policy summaries, and more.

Case-Specific

Company policies, rules, disciplinary and grievance procedures, and other information modeled after employment laws or regulations.

Here are the important benefits of having an employee handbook:

  1. Formalized Policies

A handbook can provide employees with a clear understanding of what they’re responsible for, including how to request time off, how to call in sick, and who to go to with questions about policies or procedures.

By outlining all policies and expectations on both sides of the fence, confusion and inconsistencies are essentially minimized in the workplace.

  1. Promotes Open Communication and Transparency

Open communication is key to a positive work environment. By giving new hires your handbook, you’re letting them know your mission, purpose, and core values. This sets the stage for a positive business relationship and lets team members know who they can go to with questions about their employment, rights, and work environment.

  1. Time Saved

A well-written employee handbook offers answers to the most common employees’ questions. By having an employee handbook, you will avoid constant questions over policies. Employees will be able to look up the answers themselves, thus saving your time.

  1. Legal Disputes Prevented

Lawsuits are a threat in every business, no matter its size or industry. If yours should face a lawsuit or discrimination claim one day from a current or former employee, your handbook could play an influential role in the final outcome. For this reason, make sure you have an expert review your handbook’s wording.

  1. Company culture outlined

An employee handbook is much more than a list of policies, rules and regulations. A great employee    handbook clearly communicates your company’s mission, vision and its values, thus outlining your company’s culture.

Important Note :

A handbook needs to reflect compliance with applicable federal, state and local law.

A handbook should be tailored to your organization and should reflect how you conduct business

For more information about employee handbooks or other HR solutions, contact us today at  jumpstart-hr.com/contact

 

 

The Hierarchy of Needs for Employee Engagement

The Hierarchy of Needs for Employee Engagement

The following is a guest post provided by our friends at FutureFuel

Employee engagement isn’t just a trendy phrase for your next company meeting. When your employees feel connected and engaged with the corporate mission, you will see a noticeable boost in productivity and loyalty.

 

There is no blanket strategy for increasing engagement levels because every workplace has a different culture to it. However, you can utilize the psychological concept of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to develop an employee engagement strategy that will work for your corporate environment.

What is the Hierarchy of Needs?

 

Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is a pretty straightforward concept that is generally accepted in the world of psychology. He believed that humans have five basic needs that must be fulfilled in order to stay happy and motivated, and he said that each of these needs has a place in a pyramid-style hierarchy.

 

Basic needs at the bottom of this pyramid must be taken care of first, and the higher-level needs can be addressed afterward.

 

According to Maslow, the needs must be addressed in the following order:

 

  1. Physiological needs like food, water, and shelter
  2. Safety and security
  3. Relationships and belonging
  4. Status and respect
  5. Self-actualization or personal growth

 

This hierarchy of needs can easily translate to the needs of an employee in terms of engagement. 

Hierarchy of Engagement

 

Using Maslow’s pyramid as a method of better understanding employee engagement can be helpful for developing a strategy to keep everyone feeling fulfilled when they come to work.

 

To show how this is accomplished, this section will outline each need and demonstrate how it can be applied to the workplace.

Survival Needs

 

This is the base of the pyramid, and it is what everything else must be built upon. In daily life, this is the ability to satisfy physiological needs like hunger, thirst, and sleep.

 

In the workplace, this translates more specifically to wages. At the base level of the engagement hierarchy, people are most concerned about their ability to earn a living. As much as a job should be about more than money, everyone needs money to survive in today’s world. 

Security Needs

 

After physiological needs are able to be consistently met, the next step up is safety. This is the ability to accumulate resources, maintain good health, and feel secure in day-to-day life.

 

In terms of engagement, the employees will be concerned about job security and their ability to perform well.

Belonging Needs

When security is no longer an issue, the next step toward fulfillment includes meaningful relationships and connection to others.

 

At this part of the hierarchy, employees are happiest when they feel like they’re part of a team that’s working together toward a common goal.

Status and Recognition Needs

 

Not everyone craves the spotlight, but everyone wants to feel like his or her contributions are valued.

 

In the workplace, this step of the hierarchy often translates to recognizing employees for their individual achievements. These needs can also be met by asking for and implementing feedback from individual workers.

Self-actualization

 

At the top of the pyramid is self-actualization. Here is where humans are able to explore their true potential and achieve personal growth.

 

At work, employees at the top of the pyramid are often seen as leaders by their peers. These people are happy to come to work because they feel like they’re making a difference, and their enthusiasm tends to be infectious.

Applying the Hierarchy

 

Understanding this hierarchy in the context of the workplace can help your business develop better engagement strategies.

 

One way to ensure that every employee is able to reach the higher levels of this pyramid is by managing compensation. Ensure that employees are able to earn well. Offer incentives, promotions, and raises as a way of helping workers meet the two most basic levels of needs.

 

Creating a culture that appeals to the higher levels of the hierarchy will largely depend on the industry your company is in. However, there are some basic ideas you can implement to help employees work their way up to self-actualization.

 

A good starting point is to regularly ask for feedback from everyone. It can be anonymous or not, depending on what is the most viable option for your particular corporate culture. Asking for opinions on team building events, new projects, and how best to recognize employee contributions can be very eye-opening.

 

By asking for this feedback and incorporating it into your workplace culture, you will show workers that they are being valued. You will be able to foster better relationships between employees because you will have a better understanding of what appeals to them.

Employee Engagement Is Simpler Than You Might Think

 

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs applies to everyday life, but it is also an excellent model for how your employees engage in the workplace as well.

 

Remember that the most basic of needs must be fulfilled first in the form of compensation and job security. Once employees feel secure in their positions, they will start to look for connections, respect, and a sense of higher purpose.

 

It may take a bit of trial and error to learn the best ways to implement this approach in your corporate culture, but it is well worth the effort. You will see noticeable increases in happiness, productivity, and loyalty when you begin to successfully apply the hierarchy of needs to a workplace setting.

Planning On Hiring New Employees Soon? Don’t Make These Common Onboarding Mistakes – #GMIS19

When a small business owner offers employment to a candidate, it can be one of the best feelings in the world for both sides. But what happens if somewhere along the process, mistakes are made that can eventually come back to harm the business? Even worse, what happens if the same mistakes get repeated over time – resulting in catastrophic financial losses and disruption of the business? You might not think it’s possible in your organization but no company is immune to legal trouble when it comes to onboarding new hires. On November 4, 2019, Alberto Ruisanchez, chief, U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division’s Immigrant and Employee Rights Section (IER) gave several helpful tips to stay out of trouble when making your next new hire. In his presentation, entitled “Avoiding Unlawful Immigration-Related Employment Discrimination,” Mr. Ruisanchez mentioned three key areas where employers find themselves in trouble with the law:

  • Hiring
  • Firing
  • Recruitment or Referral for a Fee

While each of these areas are critically important to pay attention to, I’ve found that most small businesses make mistakes with onboarding the most. Most specifically, there are mistakes made when proving the employee has the right to work in the United States. Here are a few tips to keep your business above board and your new hires happily employed for the long haul!

Be cautious of making hiring preferences based on citizenship status. According to Ruisanchez, many employers are unable to make hiring preferences for American citizens. What does this mean? If you have an open position at your company and non-American citizens apply, you cannot reject them on the basis of their citizenship status. For example, If Joe’s Plumbing and HVAC has an opening for a Senior Manager role, any eligible applicant cannot be dismissed simply because they are not American. If the US Department of Justice or Equal Employment Opportunity Commission discovers a practice of excluding qualified applicants from progressing in your hiring process, you may be subject to fines and back pay for all affected individuals.

Now, as with many things relating to the law, there are exceptions. Federal Contractors who participate in contracts that have citizenship-based hiring requirements, workers who are unauthorized to work in America, workers who require employer sponsorship, and, of course, wherever allowable by law.

In order to reduce the odds of trigger an inquiry by the USDOJ and EEOC, I recommend the following tips to stay on the right side of the law:

  • For roles that are open to citizens and non-citizens alike, do not ask for citizenship status the application. Only ask if the applicant is eligible to work in the United States.
  • Review your application practices to ensure they wouldn’t trigger a red flag. Seek professional help if you have any doubts.
  • Keep a record of all applicants and save paperwork + digital applications for the appropriate amount of time required by law.

Understand employee rights with completing Form I-9, and try not to be too “helpful.” When completing Form I-9, a new hire document that all employees must complete, it’s important to give each new hire a choice of which documents they use to complete the form. There are two main requirements for the Form I-9. List A documents show proof of identity and work eligibility while List B documents and List C documents combine to show proof of identity and work eligibility. You have to let the employee pick From my experience, small business owners and administrative staff might think they are being helpful by telling new applicants which I-9 documents to bring but that’s actually no-no. Here’s what I recommend instead:

  • Provide your new hire with the full list of List A, List B, and List C documentation. Here is the official USCIS list.
  • Give the employee an ample amount of time and notice to secure the documents that they know will cover both proof of identity and eligibilty to work. As the employer, you should check both to ensure neither documents have expired.
  • When it comes time to recertify an employee, follow the same course of action. Prescribing which documents to use may seem helpful but it can actually be discriminatory if you only accept certain documents.

For more helpful tips and a recap of the events from the 2019 SHRM Global Mobility and Immigration Summit, check out #GMIS19 on Twitter!

 

 

Remote Work Q&A Podcast With Ultimate Software’s Cecile Alper-Leroux [Full Interview]

Remote Work Q&A Podcast With Ultimate Software’s Cecile Alper-Leroux [Full Interview]


Download the full report here: https://www.ultimatesoftware.com/Remote-Work-Research

In this HR video podcast, Jumpstart:HR Founder Joey Price is joined by Cecile Alper-Leroux. She is the VP of Human Capital Management (HCM) Innovation at Ultimate Software, a company that provides HCM solutions in order to help organizations improve the employee experience and grow their business.

Cecil has over 20 years of experience in both national and global market and she is an internationally sought-out speaker, thought leader, and visionary on HCM trends, hot topics, and global strategies. She joined Ultimate Software in 2010 and she’s been focusing on fostering a culture of innovation at Ultimate ever since.

In this video, we will be going over the results of their latest research on the benefits of remote workers.

Our topics include:

  • What is the current state of remote work?
  • The results of Ulitmate Software’s latest study on the effects of remote work.
  • What are some of the key benefits that should encourage employers to add remote work to their business model?
  • How will having an increased number of remote workers affect managerial roles?
  • How is remote work helping women in the workplace?
  • The technological trends that are helping bridge the gap between the office and the remote workforce.

All that and a whole lot more! Stay tuned for another action-packed episode of the Business, Life, and Coffee Podcast!

Connect with Cecile:

If you enjoyed this episode please take time to give it a 5-star review!

Learn More: http://bit.ly/blcitunes

Also, check out some of our previous episodes for more advice and tips on how to boost your career and take your business to the next level!

See you next week!

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