Internal Hiring vs External Hiring – What’s Better? Ft. Fit Small Business

Internal Hiring vs External Hiring – What’s Better? Ft. Fit Small Business

Internal Hiring vs External Hiring Podcast Ft. Fit Small Business

Summary

This episode’s conversation explores the topic of internal versus external hiring in small businesses. Experts from Jumpstart HR and the Fit Small Business team discuss the key differences between the two methods, including the impact on cost, time efficiency, employee morale, retention rates, and diversity of skill sets. They also provide a five-step framework to determine whether to fill a role with an internal hire or an external hire, which includes assessing current skills and gaps, identifying growth and development opportunities, conducting a cost benefit analysis, considering cultural fit and adaptability, and evaluating long-term impact and strategic alignment.

Takeaways

-Internal and external recruitment methods have different impacts on cost, time efficiency, employee morale, retention rates, and diversity of skill sets. -A five-step framework can help small businesses determine whether to fill a role with an internal hire or an external hire: assess current skills and gaps, identify growth and development opportunities, conduct a cost benefit analysis, consider cultural fit and adaptability, and evaluate long-term impact and strategic alignment. -Communication, performance reviews, and feedback are important in assessing current skills, identifying growth opportunities, and promoting internal candidates. -Cost considerations include compensation, benefits, and potential expenses for external hiring, while internal hiring may involve salary adjustments and filling previous positions. -Cultural fit and adaptability should be considered when deciding between internal and external candidates, as well as the long-term impact and alignment with business goals.

 

Chapters

00:00 Introduction

03:23 Key differences between internal and external recruitment methods

06:00 Cost implications of internal versus external hiring

08:46 Time efficiency of internal and external recruitment methods

14:16 Effect of internal and external recruitment on employee morale and retention

16:31 Impact of internal and external candidate recruiting strategies on diversity of skill sets

21:57 Step 1: Assessment

24:30 Step 2: Identifying

28:04 Step 3: Costs

31:24 Step 4: Culture

31:54 Step 5: Long-term impact and strategic alignment

 

To learn more about Internal vs External Hiring, visit @FitSmallBusiness’s Helpful Guide: Click Here

To subscribe to Fit Small Business, visit: This Link

To work with Jumpstart HR’s team of HR professionals, schedule time: Let’s Connect

Talent & Tech: Embracing Collaboration with AI for Workplace Success | Joey Price | TEDxJeffersonU | Collaboration with AI

Talent & Tech: Embracing Collaboration with AI for Workplace Success | Joey Price | TEDxJeffersonU | Collaboration with AI

Talent & Tech: Embracing Collaboration with AI for Workplace Success

Have you ever wondered about the future of your job in the era of Artificial Intelligence (AI)? Is Collaboration with AI a possibility for most workers across the globe?

Join Joey Price, founder of Jumpstart, a national HR consulting firm, as he navigates the potential impact of AI on work and life. First, Joey raises a critical question: Could AI jeopardize our jobs and limit our children’s ability to find fulfilling careers? Secondly, through personal anecdotes, he sheds light on the transformative influence of AI, and underscores the ethical considerations surrounding AI. Finally urging the audience to envision a future where AI is an ally, not a threat, creating workplaces that inspire excitement.

In a compelling call to action, Joey advocates for the responsible development of AI, ensuring it enhances human potential and prioritizes the well-being of workers in this new era. Join Joey Price on this captivating exploration of AI’s role in reshaping our work and lives.

To learn more about the work that Jumpstart does to bring better collaboration between talent and technology at work, schedule a free 15-minute consultation call.

About Joey:

Joey V. Price is an award-winning Human Resources Executive, thought leader, and the Founder and CEO of Jumpstart:HR. The company offers HR outsourcing and consulting for startups and small businesses. Joey also co-hosts the “While We Were Working” weekly podcast for leaders in the workplace who wish to be better at handling people’s issues. A seasoned HR professional with hands-on experience in multiple organizations, Joey advocates for businesses to translate their goal into high ROI through happily engaged staff members. He also serves on the Advisory Board for the HR Department at the Forbes School of Business and Technology, the UKG Workforce Institute, and the Ethics in AI Board at Arena Analytics. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

HR Podcast: Is your workplace PUMP Act Friendly? + Can I-9’s Be Completed Remotely?

HR Podcast: Is your workplace PUMP Act Friendly? + Can I-9’s Be Completed Remotely?

Have you listened to our latest HR Podcast?

Like HR Podcasts? Subscribe To Our Weekly HR Leadership Podcast:

Apple | Spotify | Podbean | YouTube | Audible | GoodPods

Welcome to another insightful episode of the “While We Were Working” HR podcast! In this episode, we delve into the latest developments surrounding the PUMP Act and the question of whether Form I-9’s need to be completed in person. Join our expert panel as we discuss the implications of these new requirements and their impact on employers and employees alike.

 

Timestamps:

00:00 – Introduction

01:59 – Understanding the PUMP Act: Exploring its new requirements (While We Were Working Segment)

15:04 – Form I-9: In-person completion or remote alternatives? (Consultant’s Corner Segment)

Episode Details:

In this engaging HR podcast episode, our knowledgeable hosts dive deep into the intricacies of the PUMP Act, shedding light on the updated requirements that organizations need to be aware of.

We analyze the key aspects of the legislation and explore its potential implications on businesses, employee rights, and compliance obligations.

Form I-9, a crucial document for verifying employment eligibility, has traditionally required in-person completion. However, in light of evolving workplace dynamics and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we examine whether digital alternatives and remote completion options can be considered viable alternatives.

We discuss the benefits and challenges associated with these approaches and provide practical insights for employers navigating this changing landscape.

As we unravel the complexities surrounding the PUMP Act and Form I-9 requirements, our expert panel offers valuable perspectives and actionable advice.

Gain insights into compliance considerations, best practices, and the potential consequences of non-compliance.

Whether you are an employer, HR professional, or an employee seeking clarity on these matters, this episode equips you with the knowledge needed to adapt and comply with the new regulations.

Tune in to the “While We Were Working” podcast and join the conversation surrounding the PUMP Act and the evolving landscape of Form I-9 completion.

Stay informed, make informed decisions, and ensure compliance in this ever-changing world of employment regulations with our weekly HR podcast.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, and share this episode with others who may find this information valuable. Stay tuned for more engaging discussions on the “While We Were Working” podcast!

Do you need to outfit a room at your office for PUMP Act compliance? Check out this chair and more from Amazon.com

#PUMPAct #FormI9 #EmploymentRegulations #Compliance #HR #Podcast

 

Hosts: Joey Price and Sommer Ketron

This show is powered by Jumpstart:HR, LLC

Building a Team: Three Myths Small Businesses Believe When Recruiting – And What To Do Instead

Building a Team: Three Myths Small Businesses Believe When Recruiting – And What To Do Instead

Before we talk about building a team, let’s take a walk down memory lane.

Do you remember the first time you were on a team? It could’ve been a second-grade soccer team where everyone got a trophy at the end of the year regardless of how well the team did. Or it was later in life, a twelfth-grade capstone project that required collaboration for completion. No matter when you experience your first time being on a team, there’s one truth about them: they’re everywhere. So how can something so common be consistently mismanaged? It may have more to do with what we believe about teams in the first place. 

“A team is more than a collection of people. It is a process of give and take.” – Barbara Glacel

In this article, I want to share the three myths that small businesses believe when building a team, why I think these myths exist, and how to overcome them. If these resonate with you, please share them with your team and consider working with mine.

Myth 1 when building a team: The right candidate is LOOKING for your business. 

Every day in America, companies post, pray, and ponder over job descriptions, hoping they’ve cooked up the right recipe for the ideal candidate to manifest in their applicant tracking system and solve all their workload and team chemistry woes.

Building a team is hard and I’ve even been there myself. Thinking that the only thing standing between our open positions and success is a fresh job description with KPIs and culture. Unfortunately, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Unless you are a household name like Apple or Amazon, how can we be so sure that someone even knows to look for us in the first place? Of course, we believe in our brand, mission, and team – but what do we do consistently to raise awareness about our businesses and their inner workings? Suppose you want to be found by the right candidate. In that case, you must think beyond the traditional job description and share what it’s like to work in your company. These days, 70% of job seekers are passive

Stop believing that the right candidate is LOOKING for your business. More often than not, it would be best to source the right candidate for your business. What is sourcing? It’s when you proactively find candidates instead of posting a job and sifting through hundreds of candidates. As you make this shift when building a team, you feel empowered to make proactive decisions to land your next key hire. One potential decision you should consider making? Work with a recruiting agency that will source talent and use tools that reduce the time and cost it takes to hire for your organization.

Myth 2 when building a team: The right hire comes from the right school or company. 

While so much has changed over the last decade within the recruiting industry, only some hiring managers have kept up.

There was once a time when notable schools and companies were reliable pipelines to fill cookie-cutter jobs with predictable expectations. I remember the days when building a team meant that applicants from relevant universities or companies were given an automatic second look – even if their qualifications weren’t quite there. Some would even get the benefit of the doubt when it came to salary since “they used to work at [fill in the blank], they must be good!” The problem with this way of thinking now (and quite frankly, always) is that it presents an unconscious bias against high-potential talent from non-traditional or traditional backgrounds without name recognition. Take the world of IT, for example, where the US Bureau of Labor Statistics says 25% of IT workers have no college degree. Are you willing to risk passing on game-changing talent because they don’t come from the background you envisioned they would?

Instead of believing the right hire comes from the right school or company, you should know that the right candidate can articulate their skills and how they align with what you need them to do. Interviewing is all about asking excellent questions and developing mutual trust. The next time you have an opportunity to chat with a candidate with the right experience but not the right name on their diploma, break out a few good questions where you ask them to describe their experience and what challenges they’ve faced along the way. Don’t hire based on which mascot they cheer for during March Madness; employ a team member for their ability to make an impact on your team today and tomorrow.

Myth 3 when building a team: We hire to find the right person. 

One of these days, I might write a book about the parallels of marriage and building a team – but that’s a story for another time.

Right now, though, I want to address a myth we’ve been carrying for years in small business circles: there are no unicorns, ninjas, or rockstars. Instead, there are hidden gems, high-potential hires, and developmental candidates you take a chance on because you see something. Companies often want to pass on great candidates in hopes of finding “the one.” It prolongs the search process, adds extra costs, and reduces the candidate experience for everyone. You rarely find someone better qualified than the candidate you passed on because they nailed four things but were “eh” on the fifth. 

Instead of believing you recruit to find the right person, consider recruiting to find someone competent in the role that vibes with your culture and is willing to be developed. Since we’re on the topic of teams, let me speak about a sports analogy: The NBA Draft. The most successful teams in the draft aren’t the ones who waste time trying to find someone who will be an MVP right away. The most successful teams in the draft are the ones who look at their organization’s style of play, which prospects play a similar kind of basketball, and who will train and study to perform at their best over time. It’s impractical to think there’s a perfect ready-made hire out there. Why? You have a unique culture, unique management structure, and maybe a few skeletons in your operational closet.

If you think about hiring as a big-picture project, your new hire will figure out how to paint themselves in that picture with you. 

So, what’s next?

Which myth resonates with you most? There are others, but these are the biggest, in my opinion. I’d love your thoughts and for you to share this post with your colleagues. Schedule a free 15-minute call with me if your business is in need of a fresh recruiting strategy.  

 Want more recruiting tips? Watch this video:

Is a 4-Day Work Week Right for Your Small Business? Pros, Cons and Tips for Implementation

Is a 4-Day Work Week Right for Your Small Business? Pros, Cons and Tips for Implementation

While the four-day work week is not yet universal, most citizens enjoy the pleasures of added three-day weekends during the year.

– Michael From

The idea of a 4-day work week has gained popularity in recent years, with some small businesses opting to implement this schedule in order to increase productivity and improve employee satisfaction. However, before making the switch to a 4-day work week, it’s important to consider both the pros and cons.

Pros of Implementing a 4-Day Work Week:

  1. Increased productivity: By condensing the workweek, employees have more time to rest and recharge, which can lead to a more productive and engaged workforce.
  2. Reduced burnout: The added day off each week can help to reduce stress and burnout among employees, leading to a more positive work environment.
  3. Attracting and retaining employees: A 4-day work week can be an attractive benefit for potential employees, making it easier for small businesses to attract and retain top talent.
  4. Cost savings: A 4-day workweek can lead to cost savings for small businesses, as they may need to pay less for utilities, office space, and other expenses associated with keeping the office open an extra day.

Cons of Implementing a 4-Day Work Week:

  1. Reduced hours for employees: A 4-day work week can mean that employees work longer hours on the days they are in the office, which can be tiring and lead to decreased productivity.
  2. Reduced availability: With a shorter workweek, small businesses may be closed an extra day, which can make it harder for customers to reach them.
  3. Difficulty with scheduling: A 4-day workweek can make it harder for small businesses to schedule meetings and appointments, as everyone may not be available on the same days.
  4. Difficulty accommodating with unexpected events: A 4-day workweek can make it harder for small businesses to handle unexpected events, such as a rush of customers or an emergency repair, as they may not have enough staff on hand.

Listen to our Small Business HR podcast:

If you are considering implementing a 4-day workweek, here are some practical tips for making it work:

  1. Communicate with employees: Make sure to talk to your employees about the potential change and get their input.
  2. Test it out: Consider starting with a trial period to see how a 4-day workweek works for your business and your employees.
  3. Be flexible: Be willing to adjust the schedule as needed to accommodate the needs of your employees and your business.
  4. Plan ahead: Make sure to plan ahead for meetings and appointments, so that everyone is available on the same days.
  5. Be prepared for unexpected events: Have a plan in place for handling unexpected events, such as having a designated employee who can come in on their day off in case of an emergency.

Overall, a 4-day workweek can be a great option for small businesses looking to increase productivity and improve employee satisfaction. However, it’s important to carefully consider the pros and cons and be prepared to make adjustments as needed to make it work for your business.

Want to see if a 4-Day Work Week can work for your business? Contact us today.