Are You Hiring an Intern or an Employee?: The Seven Factors That Make for a True Internship Experience

Are You Hiring an Intern or an Employee?: The Seven Factors That Make for a True Internship Experience

Do You Know The Rules On Paid and Unpaid Internships?

“I’m looking for an intern because I just lost a critical employee.”

“We believe interns should be ready to contribute on the first day of their internship!”

“Our interns work as long as they’d like!”

If any of these three statements reflect your paid or unpaid internship experience, I hate to break it to you but you’re doing it wrong. Students who agree to join your organization shouldn’t be evaluated the same way as an entry-level employee because the rules of engagement aren’t the same. A quick rule of thumb is that employees are hired to SHOW and interns are groomed to GROW. If you’re in the middle of the hiring process for your summer interns and think you might be going about it wrong, we’ve got you covered!

This article will explain:

  • The merits of paid and unpaid internships
  • The seven factors that the Federal Government uses to validate an internship program
  • What to do if you’re stuck or confused

 

Are Internships Still Worth It?

If you’re a hiring manager at your organization, you’re probably wondering if internships still matter. In an era of AI and bots, lean teams and freelancers; the idea of hiring an intern might feel like an afterthought. Not only do interns legally require more hand-holding than other labor classes, but turnover is darn-near 100% since unlike Mike in Accounting who’s been at your company since the pre-Internet age, internships have to end at some point! In my professional opinion, internships are worth it for employers and interns alike! My thoughts on the subject are below but I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments section or by tweeting me on Twitter (@joeyvpriceHR).

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Check out our new employee development course site today!

If you’ve ever looked at entry-level job descriptions (or written one lately), you know the conundrum that early-stage employees face. Many “entry-level” jobs require at least 1 or 2 years of experience in the industry… But how does one get this experience without having experience? Well, a perfect way is through an internship. Whether a student has a paid or unpaid internship, there’s redeeming value for the student who makes the most of their time at work. Yes, unpaid internships continue to be a hot topic on college campuses but they do pay off. Unpaid internships offer a whole host of opportunities for students who make the most of their limited time on your team:

  • Valuable work experience
  • Opportunities to network with industry professionals
  • A chance at reducing college tuition debt

Internships also benefit employers in many ways. They offer employers a way to begin building a pipeline of future talent, increase brand recognition among early-stage professionals, and may provide skilled labor at a discounted cost to help support mission-critical tasks. However, internships also come with a degree of risk, and an unsuspecting employer may find themselves under scrutiny or facing legal penalties and fines if their internship programs do not measure up to Federal, State, and local guidelines.

What Mistakes Do Employers Make When Hiring Interns?

Perhaps the biggest issue that arises when providing internships is whether the experience actually constitutes an internship, or if it is considered to be employment. Remember, internships are meant to be an educational experience first and foremost. Thankfully, there is Federal guidance on what makes a good internship program! The following criteria and tests can be used when determining whether or not your internship program is truly an internship:

  1. Both the intern and the employer understand that the intern is not entitled to compensation

Make it clear to your interns from the very start that they will not be paid for their efforts as an intern. Try to capture this in writing either when you offer the internship to the student, or in the original announcement to which the intern applies.

  1. The internship provides training that would be given in an educational setting.

Say goodbye to the days of making your interns take everyday coffee runs, lunch orders, and other menial tasks. The work that an intern is asked to complete should be similar to that of what they would otherwise do or learn in the classroom (business majors should learn about business functions and processes, political science majors should gain an understanding of the political process, etc.)

  1. Completing the internship entitles the intern to academic credit

So, if the intern isn’t getting paid in money, what should they be paid in? Why, academic credit of course. Work with academic institutions’ internship coordinators to coordinate how many hours an internship will be expected to work, and how many credit hours the intern may be expected to receive.

  1. The internship is limited in duration and educates the intern

Put a time limit on how long the intern will be expected to work for your company. This helps in setting expectations for your interns, as well as in determining the number of credits your interns will receive for their experience. How long should an intern last, you might ask….?

  1. The internship corresponds with the academic calendar.

Depending on the State, college, or academic program, this length might differ. However, make sure that the internship corresponds as closely as possible to the academic calendars of the colleges in which your interns are enrolled.

  1. The work complements, rather than displaces the work of a paid employee

Plain and simple, your interns should not replace your regular workers. Doing so almost universally results in your interns being considered regular, paid employees. Not to mention, it is also unethical and, if your interns continue not to be paid, could result in stiff fines for your company.

  1. The intern is not entitled or promised a paid job at the end of the internship.

Promising an intern a job doing essentially the same things they’ve been doing as an intern causes problems. Mainly, it essentially creates an “unpaid trial service period” to test out employees until they become regular employees. A documented or promised job at the end of the internship also can be seen as creating an employment relationship.

By no means does this list preclude you from paying your interns for the work they do for your company. In fact, you may need to pay your interns in order to be competitive and attract top college talent to intern for your organization. However, it is important to keep the above 7 factors in mind, regardless of whether your interns are paid or unpaid.

No More #MeToo_ Preventing Sexual Harassment at Work

Help Prevent Sexual Harassment with Our New Training Program.

Do You Want to Build The Perfect Internship Experience?

If you’ve gotten this far in the post, pat yourself on the back! It shows that you’re committed to helping your workplace be a launching point for successful students who benefit from mentorship at your office.  If you’re interested in building out your internship program – or refining it – contact us today! It never hurts to have a second set of professional eyes reviewing your program to make sure it’s perfect. Jumpstart:HR, LLC can assess your internship program for the following:

  • Does your internship program pass the seven-step test?
  • Is your internship program one that students want to sign up for?
  • How do you make the most of the time your interns have with you?
  • How do you attract interns that resonate with your brand/mission/values?
  • What do I need to know/do if an intern doesn’t quite work out and needs to be terminated?

These are all big questions that we talk for small businesses and small teams at larger institutions. Drop us a note and let’s chat!

Have You Seen Our Latest Video?

 

The Ugly Truth That Startups Ignore In The Hiring Process

The Ugly Truth That Startups Ignore In The Hiring Process

“Failure should not be a surprise”

– Joey Price, CEO, Jumpstart:HR, LLC

Startup HR Advice from my weekly YouTube Series

It can be expensive to fail at hiring a new employee in a small business or startup. In this video, Joey Price, of Jumpstart:HR, LLC gives you everything you need to know about low quality of hire and how to improve candidate experience and your employee onboarding results.

Visit us on the web: www.jumpstart-hr.com

Subscribe to My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKuWjYbjK7IJ5ocMfkxY3Ig

Follow Me on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/joeyvprice

Follow Me on Instagram: www.instagram.com/joeyvpricehr

Follow Me on Twitter: www.twitter.com/joeyvpricehr

What Tips Would You Give To A Startup To Prevent Bad Hiring?

Comment Below!

[Podcast] After #MeToo: Changing The Way We Work

[Podcast] After #MeToo: Changing The Way We Work

The following post is originally shared on the website of Georgia Public Broadcasting. Jumpstart:HR CEO Joey Price lends his comments to the global conversation surrounding the #metoo movement and addressing sexual harassment at work.

“#MeToo is not only a movement about sexual harassment. As Rebecca Traister put it in The Cut, it’s a reckoning for the way we work, and a call to change the power dynamics leading to sexual abuse. We talk with people who dedicate, in different ways, their professional lives to understanding toxic work environments and how to dismantle them.  Erica Clemmons is the Georgia State Director for 9 to 5; Marie Mitchell is a professor of management at the University of Georgia’s business school; and Joey Price is the CEO of Jumpstart:HR, a human resources consulting firm based in Baltimore.” – Source

 

If your business needs to re-evaluate it’s sexual harassment policy in 2018, contact us now.

Don’t Hire Another Employee Before You Grab This *Mandatory* New Form

Don’t Hire Another Employee Before You Grab This *Mandatory* New Form

If there’s one thing I’m sure you enjoy as a small business owner or manager, it’s keeping up with changes in Washington and the impact it has on your business and your ability to hire new employees. Don’t worry, Jumpstart;HR, LLC has you covered with the latest update you need to know.

On July 17, 2017, The USCIS (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services) released the new Form I-9, replacing the current version that expires on September 17, 2017. Not sure if you’re using the most recent, or second-most recent, document? Skip the worry and download the latest version by clicking the link below:

Download Jumpstart HR Form I-9

There are many reasons why small businesses suffer financial setbacks, but a big one is HR non-compliance when completing paperwork (see the video below). You can ensure you’re on the right path of compliance by constantly reviewing your forms and deleting old, expired on-boarding and new hire forms. This includes tax documents, employment verification documents, and other statutory forms specific to your state.

At Jumpstart:HR, LLC, we’re passionate about keeping your business in business and helping you grow. Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter so you can be kept in the loop about changes in legislation and HR best practices.

 

What is Form I-9?:

Form I-9 is used for verifying the identity and employment authorization of individuals hired for employment in the United States. All U.S. employers must ensure proper completion of Form I-9 for each individual they hire for employment in the United States. This includes citizens and non-citizens. Source: https://www.uscis.gov/i-9

Need help with HR Compliance and on-boarding employees at your organization?

Contact Us Today

Expert Interview Series: Joey Price of Jumpstart:HR on Why Good HR People are Compliance Experts, Talent Consultants, and Workforce Planners

An excerpt from a recent Expert HR leader interview of Jumpstart:HR CEO Joey V. Price:

What are some of the recent compliance issues that are causing small businesses to alter their HR practices and procedures?
The false-start on overtime compliance regulation changes, potential minimum wage hikes, and the national conversation on immigration reform have small business HR experts on the edge of our seats trying to strategize for what comes next.

The false-start around overtime compliance caused a ton of headaches since employers invested time and resources into telling staff members about drastic federal policy changes that ultimately never happened – and it made companies evaluate their business practices. Those business practices that were impacted by the threat of overtime rule changes include: employee scheduling, accessing email while off-the-clock, greater emphasis on ROI from a 40-hour workweek, and job misclassification for employees in roles such as administrative assistant and non-managerial corporate employees.

Minimum wage hikes will cause employers to adjust pay scales from the ground up. Some retail and fast food companies are moving towards chatbots and artificial intelligence to manage customer order taking/tracking and reduce labor related expenses. Immigration reform is a huge agenda item for our current president. It’s resulted in a cutback on corporate travel for foreign-born and naturalized citizens, a push for unity and stronger corporate D&I stances, and a look at hiring practices for STEM careers (positions often dominated in the H-1B visa application process). It will be interesting to see how each of these challenges plays out because they all represent external forces that impact the way small businesses conduct themselves.

If a startup business owner were to say to you, “I don’t need to worry about workforce planning for the future. I’ll just hire on more people as I need them,” how might you respond?
I’d simply tell them about the old saying “failure to plan is a plan to fail!” You have to visualize and plan for what a successful organization looks like, or you’ll be driven to change based on the flavor or fire of the day.

Practically speaking, workforce planning while in the startup phase is the best thing you can do to chart a course for where you want a company to be and what values you want it to reflect. This is critical because it allows you to have clarity regarding the right person to attract to your organization and how to support them once they arrive.

This exercise adds value in the following measurable ways:
Read the full interview at JohnMattone.com

Expert Interview Series: Joey Price of Jumpstart:HR on Why Good HR People are Compliance Experts, Talent Consultants, and Workforce Planners

An excerpt from a recent Expert HR leader interview of Jumpstart:HR CEO Joey V. Price:

What are some of the recent compliance issues that are causing small businesses to alter their HR practices and procedures?
The false-start on overtime compliance regulation changes, potential minimum wage hikes, and the national conversation on immigration reform have small business HR experts on the edge of our seats trying to strategize for what comes next.

(more…)

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