What your company needs to know about “gaming” your way up the corporate ladder

Gamification is one of the hottest topics in HR technology today. As explained by Gamification Co, gamification brings together game mechanics and marketing to create engagement and solve problems. By incorporating a company’s operations with elements such as achievements, badges, and levels, gamification increases both user engagement and a sense of loyalty among a community.

 

What is gamification?

Gamification is the application of game mechanics to workplace problems and employee engagement. According to analyst Jason Averbook, “the theory is that by applying the same principles that inspire people to play games – achievements, status, and rewards – to employee performance, businesses can drive deeper engagement, and increase alignment with corporate goals“. Engaging employees with tasks that resemble a game could potentially increase their immersion in their work, promising significant increases to productivity and retention.

 

Why does gamification work?

According to online blogger Robert Scott, gamification appeals to the natural human needs to achieve, compete, be recognized, and be entertained. By converting tasks into a game, gamification converts a user’s logical decisions (“I work because of my paycheck”) into emotional decisions (“I work because I want to succeed”). As a result, implementing game mechanics such as achievements and badges fuels an individual’s drive to succeed, creating an immersion unmatched by other resources.

 

How can I gamify my company?

Andrew Butow suggests that for gamification to be successfully integrated to HR practices, several factors need to be considered, such as:

  • people interact with the tool frequently
  • there exists a community that people care about recognition in
  • interaction points are easily quantified
  • adoption is a high priority

Gamification mechanics in HR include badges or achievement levels as rewards for significant workplace accomplishments or contributions. Quizzes, points, or leaderboards could also be used to stimulate competition among employees, increasing engagement and participation among employees.

 

As Josh Braaten, an Online Marketing Manager at Rasmussen College, puts it, “while games were once solely played for pleasure, game and simulation applications are now used widely within companies as a tool for organizational development.” Gamification is a rapidly growing field, with GSummit, a convention discussing gamification techniques and practices, attracting companies such as Microsoft, NBC, and United. Other businesses such as Rypple, Badgeville, PeopleFluent, and Sharepoint have focused on implementing gamification mechanics into the traditional HR practices of performance reviews and workplace wellness. By gamifying its HR technologies, a company can ultimately increase its productivity and workplace participation. How can you gamify your business to improve performance and employee interaction?

 

– Article Courtesy of Jumpstart:HR HR Technology Intern Olivier Jin

 

What your company needs to know about “gaming” your way up the corporate ladder

A Portrait of the Gamer as a Young Professional

How the rise of gamification is affecting HR technology and the way companies think

Human Resources Gamification - HR Technology

http://www.mitbig.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/home.jpg

 

Gamification is one of the hottest topics in HR technology today. As explained by Gamification Co, gamification brings together game mechanics and marketing to create engagement and solve problems. By incorporating a company’s operations with elements such as achievements, badges, and levels, gamification increases both user engagement and a sense of loyalty among a community.

 

What is gamification?

Gamification is the application of game mechanics to workplace problems and employee engagement. According to analyst Jason Averbook, “the theory is that by applying the same principles that inspire people to play games – achievements, status, and rewards – to employee performance, businesses can drive deeper engagement, and increase alignment with corporate goals“. Engaging employees with tasks that resemble a game could potentially increase their immersion in their work, promising significant increases to productivity and retention.

 

Why does gamification work?

According to online blogger Robert Scott, gamification appeals to the natural human needs to achieve, compete, be recognized, and be entertained. By converting tasks into a game, gamification converts a user’s logical decisions (“I work because of my paycheck”) into emotional decisions (“I work because I want to succeed”). As a result, implementing game mechanics such as achievements and badges fuels an individual’s drive to succeed, creating an immersion unmatched by other resources.

 

How can I gamify my company?

Andrew Butow suggests that for gamification to be successfully integrated to HR practices, several factors need to be considered, such as:

  • people interact with the tool frequently
  • there exists a community that people care about recognition in
  • interaction points are easily quantified
  • adoption is a high priority

Gamification mechanics in HR include badges or achievement levels as rewards for significant workplace accomplishments or contributions. Quizzes, points, or leaderboards could also be used to stimulate competition among employees, increasing engagement and participation among employees.

 

As Josh Braaten, an Online Marketing Manager at Rasmussen College, puts it, “while games were once solely played for pleasure, game and simulation applications are now used widely within companies as a tool for organizational development.” Gamification is a rapidly growing field, with GSummit, a convention discussing gamification techniques and practices, attracting companies such as Microsoft, NBC, and United. Other businesses such as Rypple, Badgeville, PeopleFluent, and Sharepoint have focused on implementing gamification mechanics into the traditional HR practices of performance reviews and workplace wellness. By gamifying its HR technologies, a company can ultimately increase its productivity and workplace participation. How can you gamify your business to improve performance and employee interaction?

 

– Article Courtesy of Jumpstart:HR HR Technology Intern Olivier Jin

 

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Lip Service: The Top 3 Ways to Tell if Your Company Does Not Put “People First”

People are our greatest resource... or not!

People are our greatest resource... or not!

“People are our greatest resource.”

A phrase that has become HR’s version of the National Anthem is somehow becoming (or perhaps always been) a bit of lip service that sounds good in theory but doesn’t play out in practice. How can you tell? With 84% of employees looking for a new job in 2012, we have no doubt seen some of our greatest people leave our organizations to move onto greener pastures. Moreover, recent research shows that only 45% of employees are “satisfied” at work.

Sure, your organization may be advertising the fact that you put people first and care about the professional and personal development of your employees but what message are you really sending in practice? Here are three messages that your actions send to employees who truly know when they’re being fed lip service:

 

“We don’t take interest in our people.” Quick, how many daughters does your Lead Staff Accountant have? Is Brenda in Sales allergic to seafood? Which of your employees have anniversary dates in the next four weeks? These are some of the questions that people who work in “People First” organizations can answer or at least don’t have a problem asking and finding out. From a practical perspective, employees who work for organizations where people truly are the most important resource know it to be true because they feel valued as a person and know that others care enough to ask “So, got any plans this weekend?” and truly want to know.

“We don’t train our people.” Many companies across the US this year will upgrade their computers, email systems, VOIP service, coffee pots, etc. but not spend a dime (or relevantly significant amount of money) on employee training. Companies that do not invest in their employees are sending the message that we are keen on acquiring talent but not nurturing it. If you are an HR professional concerned about turnover and employee motivation, just remember that you can only be “acquired” once by an organization. If the biggest investment you have in your people is giving more responsibilities and/or promotion without access to non-OTJ (On-the-Job) training then no, you aren’t putting people first.

“We don’t value your opinion.” One of the biggest complaints that I’ve heard from various disgruntled employees is that their company just doesn’t listen. You have to remember that Human Resources often times acts like Customer Service for our internal clients (read: Employees). Are serious issues going unresolved or unaddressed in your workplace? Are there small whispers about employee unrest that you tend to ignore? Don’t be surprised if your lack of open communication and receptivity lead to low employee engagement and demoralization.

 

Is your organization sending mixed messages about putting employees first? Have you left an organization because you felt under appreciated? Feel free to share your comments below.

 

Don’t let your best employees walk away without knowing how to get them to stay.  Jumpstart:HR provides both corporate culture analysis and on-going managed HR services to help identify key cultural challenges that hinder employee engagement and to help improve the consistency, reliability and knowledge of your Human Resources Department.